Updated Action Plan for Tick bites

We have recently had an increase of students reporting tick related allergies to our school. Please note that we will now be following the latest action plan suggested by ascia (Australian society of clinical Immunology and allergy) which is to kill the tick by using ether-containing spray.

Following is an excerpt from ascia, you may like to read the full details here to best manage tick bites at home.

What to do if you find a tick lodged in your skin and you are NOT allergic to ticks:
Never attempt to place any chemical such as methylated spirits onto the tick, nor should it be touched or disturbed, as the tick will inject saliva into the skin. The aim is to first kill the tick with an ether-containing spray and then remove it as soon as is practicable and in as safe a setting as is possible. Doing so may reduce the possibility of you becoming allergic to ticks and may also reduce the risk of you contracting a tick-borne infectious disease or developing tick paralysis.
What to do if you find a tick lodged in your skin and you are ALLERGIC to tick bites:
If you have been diagnosed as allergic to ticks, you should have emergency medication -adrenaline (epinephrine) autoinjector (e.g. EpiPen®), a means of summoning medical assistance, and a signed ASCIA Action Plan from your GP or the hospital.
If you find a tick, do NOT forcibly remove the tick, but rather kill the tick first by using a product to rapidly freeze the tick to prevent it from injecting more allergen-containing saliva. In a tick allergic person, the tick should be killed and removed in a safe place (e.g. an emergency department of a hospital).
Ether-containing aerosol sprays are currently recommended for killing the tick. Aerostart® or ether-containing sprays (e.g. Wart-Off Freeze®, Elastoplast Cold Spray®) has also been effective. Freezing the tick (regardless of whether one is concerned about transmission of infection, tick paralysis or tick allergy) may also have the advantage of reducing the risk of tick sensitisation and later development of tick allergy or related allergic syndromes.
For those who have had severe reactions to tick bites, it is now possible to test for Mammalian Meat Allergy.