CBRSS congratulates Byron Bay’s Bundjalung people on their land and sea native title determination

Byron Bay’s Bundjalung people celebrate long-awaited land and sea native title determination

A native title claim for areas of land and sea around Byron Bay in northern New South Wales has been approved almost two decades since it was first lodged with the Federal Court.

“There is no fear in native title,” Ms Rotumah said. “Native title is a recognition of people’s rights and interests in lands and waters. It means [the Bundjalung] can continue to be sustained by the ocean, to go out and fish, and beach worm, get pippies — all those things we’ve been able to do, and now we’re having a rubber stamp put on it giving us the thumbs up.”

Read the full article by ABC news here.

How the iPhone rewrote the teenage brain

Lawyer and social researcher David Gillespie has been delving into the complex business of the teenage brain. He says the usual teenage compulsions like smoking, drinking and drug taking are in steep decline, as teenagers are now more likely to seek a pleasure hit from their screens.

But the games and social media apps they use are deliberately engineered to be addictive.

Unlike drugs and cigarettes, their devices are supported by parents, with few restrictions on their use.

Listen to an excellent interview with David Gillespie by Richard Fidler on the ABC’s Conversations here

David’s Book on this subject is called Teen Brain and is published by MacMillan

New Waldorf 100 Movie

“Becoming…” – a new film explores early childhood around the world in the 21st century.

On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of Waldorf Education, Waldorf 100 in cooperation with the International Association for Steiner/Waldorf early childhood education (IASWECE) presents a film about early childhood today in the mirror of different cultures worldwide.

No age has a deeper impact on the whole of life than the first years of childhood. “During those first seven years, children develop their bodily foundation for life. They explore and experience the world with their senses and through meeting the other. These early encounters in life have a deep influence and long lasting effect on the making of their own being,” says Clara Aerts, coordinating member of IASWECE and co-producer of the film, which was shot in the USA, Israel, Japan, India, South Africa, Guatemala, the Czech Republic, Switzerland and Germany. “The experiences that we make possible – or withhold – for our children at this age form the most elementary basis for their further lives and thus ultimately for the future of humanity.”

“Becoming…” is the third film in a series of short films produced on the occasion of the centenary of Waldorf Education under the direction of the award-winning Californian documentary filmmaker Paul Zehrer, and which provide an insight into the inclusive diversity of Waldorf Education under the most diverse cultural, social, religious and economic conditions around the globe. “Becoming…” was premiered at the international IASWECE congress “Inner Freedom – Social Responsibility”, which took place in April at the Goetheanum in Switzerland. The film is now available on the websites of Waldorf 100 and IASWECE.

Today there are almost 2,000 early childhood centres and around 1,200 schools worldwide that work on the basis of Steiner/Waldorf education. In 2019, the anniversary year, a large number of events, congresses and activities take place all over the world, dedicated to the challenges of the present and the future and involving pupils, parents and teachers alike.

Waldorf 100 coordinates these activities. On 19 September 2019, the central worldwide celebration will take place in Berlin’s Tempodrom.

For further information please contact Henning Kullak-Ublick, hku@waldorf-100.org.

Watch the video by clicking this link

I Don’t Want Parents to Feel Guilty, I Do Want Them to Trust Their Child More

Limiting screen time or even going full bore screen free has been equated with some kind of super-involved, activity-curating parenting. If you walked into my home, you would know this is quite a myth.

We may have more “messes” and odd “junk” lying around than the average family, but perhaps less parent involvement. I do love to play with my kids and do it quite often. But, my husband and I both work, I run every day, we always cook at home and like to talk to each other once in a while. That means I cannot possibly be playing with my children all the time.

Being Screen Free Doesn’t Mean I Don’t Take Time for Myself

“I need a moment’s peace,” or “I refuse to feel guilty about screen time when it’s the only way to make dinner,” imply that those parents who don’t utilize screens in this way take no time for themselves. I think it’s quite the opposite.

It’s actually rather narcissistic to believe that we are the center of our child’s universe. We are critically important, but make no mistake, your child is the center of their world.

Let me also say that I bear no grudge or judgment against parents who do use screen time in a limited fashion for specific purposes. However, I do disagree with the idea that it is typically necessary.

Being Screen Free Does Mean I Trust my Child

When I go for a run, do yoga, make dinner, read, talk to my husband, filter through permission slips and bills, or any other activity that requires my full attention, I trust my child to find something to do. This is called “self-directed play” and it means that I recognize the need to get out of my child’s way, at times. I think this sends a very different message than handing over a screen when I cannot pay attention. To me, handing over the screen seems kind of apologetic, “I’m so sorry I can’t pay attention to you. Because I feel guilty about that, here’s some curated, highly engaging content so you don’t have to be aware of my lack of attention”

I want my child to know I cannot pay attention to them sometimes. I want them to sometimes struggle with that. I want them to know that I believe they can do it. They can handle the struggle. They can find something interesting and creative to do that is far better than anything I could curate for them. I want them to have continuous small exposures to negative emotions (jealousy, boredom, loneliness), so they do not feel the need to distract themselves from these emotions later in life.

Read the full article at Screen Free Parenting here

Why Kids Need Wilderness And Adventure More Than Ever

Let your kids be wild.

These days, our kids’ lives are overscheduled, filled with pressure, and can be pretty intense. School, homework, sports and/or other extracurricular activities fill the week and often consumes many weekends as well. We all can feel like there is no time left to fit anything else in. There has to be. Our younger kids and teenagers need wilderness and adventure in their lives and who better to model it to them than us, their parents. I would actually argue that it is more important than a lot of the scheduled activities we have them in now. Wilderness and adventure will help develop them into well-rounded young adults.

Read the full article here